Battle of Mobile Bay - newikis.com.

American Battlefield Trust's map of the Battle of Mobile Bay. On August 5, 1864, Rear Admiral David Farragut’s Union fleet of eighteen ships entered Mobile Bay in two columns and received a devastating fire from Forts Gaines and Morgan at the mouth of the bay. The monitor USS Tecumseh sank early in the action. After passing the forts, Farragut engaged in a slugfest with the Confederate.

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The Battle of Mobile Bay of August 5, 1864, was an engagement of the American Civil War in which a Federal fleet commanded by Rear Admiral David G. Farragut, assisted by a contingent of soldiers, attacked a smaller Confederate fleet led by Admiral Franklin Buchanan and three forts that guarded the entrance to Mobile Bay. The battle was marked by Farragut's seemingly rash but successful run.Farragut is certainly the most heralded figure of the individuals we will discuss on this site, and was the first person in United Stated history to be promoted to Vice-Admiral. An interesting fact about Farragut it that he, in fact, was born in Tennessee, the state for whom the Confederate ironclad was named. Order No. 10, in text below, discusses how the ships are to prepare for battle, and.All of these issues converged at the Battle of Mobile Bay, which began on August 5, 1864 when Admiral Farragut's fleet moved into the torpedo-filled Mobile Bay. The fleet included 14 wooden ships (including the flagship Hartford ), four monitors (the Tecumseh, Manhattan, Winnebago, and Chickasaw ), as well as several gunboats that stayed nearby if needed.


Farragut next turned his attention to Mobile Bay, Ala., which was defended by several forts, the largest of which was Fort Morgan.A line of mines (“torpedoes”) on one side of the bay’s channel obliged any attacking ships to pass close to Fort Morgan on the other side of the channel, and the Confederate ironclad Tennessee was also stationed in the bay.Admiral David Glasgow Farragut (1801-1870), began his military career at age nine. He served as a midshipman on the frigate Essex during the War of 1812, and led campaigns against Caribbean-based pirates during the 1820s. He later fought in the Mexican War. At the outset of the Civil War, Farragut’s Union sympathies compelled him to move from Virginia to Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. He won.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

The Battle of Mobile Bay of August 5, 1864, was an engagement of the American Civil War in which a Federal fleet commanded by Rear Adm. David G. Farragut, assisted by a contingent of soldiers, attacked a smaller Confederate fleet led by Adm. Franklin Buchanan and three forts that guarded the entrance to Mobile Bay. The battle was marked by Farragut's seemingly rash but successful run through.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

The adopted son of Commodore David Porter, Admiral David G. Farragut rose through the ranks to command the Union Navy during the Civil War. Winning victories at New Orleans, on the Mississippi, and at Mobile Bay, David G. Farragut became the first US naval officer to attain the ranks of rear admiral, vice admiral, and admiral.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

On August 5th, 1864, Rear Admiral David Farragut led the Union navy into Mobile Bay, Alabama, to face a smaller Confederate fleet under the command of Admiral Franklin Buchanan and neutralize three forts surrounding Mobile Bay to complete the Union blockade of the Gulf of Mexico. The battle would prove pivotal in the Union victory, as well as President Abraham Lincoln’s re-election three.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

In command was Admiral David Farragut, who had led the successful Union naval campaigns to take New Orleans, Vicksburg, and Port Hudson. Army. General Gordon Granger: Union Army forces provisioned for the battle included approximately 3,000 soldiers, not enough to secure Mobile itself but sufficient to neutralize and occupy the Confederate forts defending the bay. The ground forces were led by.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

Though Farragut resided in Norfolk, Virginia prior to the Civil War, he was a Southern Unionist who strongly opposed Southern secession and remained loyal to the Union after the outbreak of the Civil War.

Battle of Mobile Bay - history.navy.mil.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

The Battle of Mobile Bay of August 5, 1864, was an engagement of the American Civil War in which a Union fleet commanded by Rear Admiral David G. Farragut, assisted by a contingent of soldiers, attacked a smaller Confederate fleet led by Admiral Franklin Buchanan and three forts that guarded the entrance to Mobile Bay. New Orleans, the largest city in the Confederacy, was already under threat.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

The Battle of Mobile Bay was the bloodiest engagement on water of the American Civil War. Mobile Bay and the port of Mobile, Alabama, were vital to the Confederate war effort. Alabama was an important center for Southern iron manufacturing, including heavy guns and rolled iron plate. Mobile was one of the few deepwater ports available to the Confederacy in 1864 and was an important.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

In this lesson, we will explore the events and outcome of the 1864 naval battle at Mobile Bay, Alabama, that pitted Admiral David Farragut's Union navy against Admiral Franklin Buchanan's.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

Civil War - Mobile Bay Admiral Farragut Entrance - Weir 1864. American Civil War Battle Maps - Civil War Map Print - Rear Admiral David Farragutt - Hatch 1864 - This is an exquisite full-color Reproduction printed on high-quality gloss paper, art paper or canvas.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

Admiral David Glasgow Farragut had been in the Navy since he was a midshipman of nine. He would remain in the Navy until his death at sixty-nine. Sixty-three on August 5, 1864, the victor of New Orleans had energy that surpassed that of most of the young sailors in his fleet that he was about to lead against the Confederate batteries, forts and fleet that guarded Mobile Bay. The Union.

Civil War - Mobile Bay Admiral Farragut Entrance - Weir.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

USS Chickasaw (1864-1874) -- in the Battle of Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. USS Chickasaw was the last in line of the four monitors that covered Rear Admiral Farragut's fleet as it passed Fort Morgan during the Battle of Mobile Bay, and was the only one whose performance that day was not flawed by tragedy or mechanical breakdowns. After passing the fort, she played a leading role in the capture.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

After Tennessee was captured and Mobile Bay secured, Admiral Farragut sent Chickasaw to shell the fort from the Mobile Bay, and the twin turreted monitor did just that, sending a couple of dozen shells down range, then swinging back east to assist the troops preparing for a push on Fort Gaines, on Dauphen Island, with naval gunfire if needed. Not a single one of Fort Powell's 18 guns fired a.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

The Union admiral who was trusted with the mission of securing the Bay of Mobile was David Farragut. Farragut was an experienced seaman, starting his career in War of 1812, at the age of nine, when he served as a midshipman aboard the USS Essex. In 1822, he was a lieutenant battling the pirates in the West Indies and during the Mexican-American War, he was a full captain commanding the USS.

Admiral farragut battle of mobile bay

Directed by Michael Marr. With Jim Fuchs, Ron Meszaros. Admiral David Farragut, a Southerner, leads the Northern fleet into Mobile Bay Aug 5, 1864. Met by Northerner Admiral Franklin Buchanan leading the Southern fleet in a fight to the death during the Civil War' largest naval battle. Farragut and Buchanan had served together as career officers in the U.S. Navy for 45 years.